Posts Tagged ‘biopyschosocial’

The Department Store Approach to Pain

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

Written By
Kevin Murray, M.A. (pending)
Movement Masterminds – CEO
Function First – Director of Education
2012 CSEP CPT of the Year

THE SIZING APPEAL

The Small, Medium, Large concept to clothing that all department stores embody seems like a straightforward, pragmatic approach to sizing. If the article of clothing fits, you’re golden; If not, you’re either going up a size, or down. But what about those that fall between the cracks? Or above, or below those labels?

s-m-l

I constantly run into this predicament. Sometimes a small is too tight. Other times a medium drapes off my shoulders, which was a good look for me in the 90’s with skateboard in hand – not so cool anymore. I often wish there was a size “smedium”, right in between at that “sweet spot.”

Perhaps you can relate… maybe your frame deserves a “marge”, right in between medium and large.

ATTENTION ALL “SHOPPERS”:
DUALISTIC THINKING IS OUT-OF-DATE & NO LONGER IN STOCK!

Am I really posting up an article about clothing? As much as I dig fashion, the department store approach is actually a metaphor for the movement industry in many respects, and its modus operandi to complex pain problems.

For example, you may be familiar with conceptualized strategies such as:

• Tight hips = stretch em’
• Weak glutes = strengthen em’
• Noticeable swelling = ice that sh#t
• IT Band irritation = foam roll those puppies

A dualistic, department store approach emphasizes that although all individual’s move differently and come from different backgrounds and cultures, there are essentially only 3-types of people – small, medium and large. Chronic pain on the other hand is complex, embodying dynamic dimensions that encompass myriad variables expanding beyond the optics of biomechanical and connective tissue principles alone. A diverse approach to sizing is needed.

GEORGE ENGEL’s BPS APPROACH:
TAILORED FOR ALL SHAPES AND SIZES – SINCE 1977

Progressing beyond (but not excluding) biomechanics and connective tissue, a 3-dimensional approach to working with clients’ in pain include a vast variety of biopsychosocial ingredients and considerations:

• Systems theories
• Empathetic listening
• Uncovering client’s’ values and beliefs systems
• Establishing client trust
• Providing educational dividends around the context of pain
• Explaining the protective purpose that pain serves

are all in play when considering the Neuromatrix and its influence on how we collaborate with, and coach our clients’ in pain.

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SUIT YOU, SIR

Working with the chronic pain demographic is much like being a tailor. Each individual comes in with unique dimensions and constraints; different outcomes and desires. A tailor is seeking to understand where specific attention needs to be placed. A tailor asks questions like:

Why doesn’t their clothing fit?
Have they ever been to a tailor before? If so, what was their experience?
How will we know when a successful amendment has taken effect?
What is their specific outcome?

A tailor considers multiple dimensions into his/her analysis and thought process, outside the shackles of unidimensional constraints. Instead, diversification is personified, driven by the uniqueness of each individual and their articles of clothing.

Individuals’ in pain each have their own unique articles of clothing (yes, we’re still talking metaphorically here) that need specific attention and consideration. If you can meet your clients’ unique needs, much like a tailor does, than you’ll have accomplished something truly special in your clients’ eyes.

Amidst the waves of uncertainty that accompany working with individuals’ experiencing chronic pain and relinquishing a dualistic/department store thought-process, above all remember you’re interacting with another individual – and not a mechanistic instrument. Be kind, be empathetic, and as often as possible seek to understand rather than judge.

“The quality of the therapeutic relationship appears to be more predictive of success than any theoretical approach of the helper.” John Nuttall

Beyond Biomechanics and Chronic Pain Clients

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

The following video is an exchange between Function First Director of Education Kevin Murray and myself on the critical portions of the bio-psycho-social model. These are aspects of the client that we have to respect, acknowledge and consider when working with those in chronic pain. Understanding the interplay between the 3 pieces of the BPS model help you provide the most effective intervention possible.

The Power of Inquiry: 4 Core Questions of Maximum Influence

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

How Does Change Occur?
By Kevin Murray

Is there a specific formula or process that brings about change faster than others? How is it for some, change is immediate and permanent? While for others change is illusive and lasts mere moments?

Questions change our thinking process, therefore the answers we ascertain are in direct result to the quality of the question.

Mastering the art of asking purposeful and powerful questions is an essential ingredient that’s necessary for accelerated change and client breakthroughs’. ALL change begins with the client questioning his or her own thoughts, feelings and beliefs regarding pain, and/or the story behind it.
Questions
The following are the ‘4 Core Questions’ created for each pain-free movement specialist to ask their clients’ experiencing chronic pain. Once answered, the clients’ psychological & sociological needs are reviled, yielding invaluable information:

1) “What specifically have you missed out on because of chronic pain?”
The answer to this question provides the pain-free movement specialist with a precise blueprint to the psychological downside that chronic pain has manifested specific to the individual, while synergistically allowing the practitioner to align with the desired outcomes of the client.

In addition, while evaluating this question, each client methodically strips away superficial layers and discovers his or her hidden aspirations to what’s really significant and worth pursuing, while simultaneously moving away from undesirable realities.

2) “How will you know when the corrective intervention has been a success?”
Here’s the truth, what matters to the client is not the overly-pronated sub-talar joint or valgus knee the practitioner may observe. Those phrases mean nothing to the individual in pain.

What really matters to the chronic pain sufferer needs to be uncovered and articulated, which this question is designed to achieve.

Interestingly, it’s often surprising the lack of clarity many clients exhibit when asked to define the specifics to what a successful intervention entails.

Therefore, this question requires each client to focus precisely on defining their “rules to success”. The pain-free movement specialist greatly enhances the probability of successfully navigating ‘unpredictable waters’ once the rules are clear and coherent.

3) “If chronic pain was no longer the reality, what would you do differently?”
This question subconsciously grants permission for each individual to begin crafting the mental framework of what a life that’s no longer interrupted by pain will look like, while simultaneously shifting their conscious intentions back towards the emotional states that are most meaningful in his or her life.

Painting a clear picture of the emotional and physical ambitions significant to the chronic pain sufferer is a critical ingredient in creating pain-free transformations. It’s during this process where uncertainty & apprehension shifts towards inspiration & possibility.

4) “What would a life without pain mean to you?”
We cannot force our beliefs or emotional values on clients.

This question provides a vital spark that begins the mapping process to each client’s exploration for meaning, which is essentially the catalyst to providing an environment that’s truly unique to the individual’s wants, desires, aspirations and goals.

The art of a successful intervention involves uncovering (through curious inquiry) which values and ethical conduct each client abides by, the belief system that guides them, and ultimately what’s most meaningful and worthwhile pursuing.

Question: Can you recall a time when a particular question had a positive impact on your personal or professional life? Do you have a powerful question that you ask each client? Please leave a comment below.

Written by:
Kevin Murray
Movement Masterminds – CEO
Function First – Director of Education

Understanding Pain Video 1

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Here is the 1st installment in the Understanding Pain Video Series.

Is this your first introduction to the bio-psycho-social model? If so, what are your thoughts thus far?

If you’re already familiar, how has implementing it helped you in your journey in understanding pain? Please share your comments below.