Archive for the ‘Health and fitness professionals’ Category

Yellow Brick Road PFMS Sister Curriculum

Friday, December 7th, 2018

Written by
Kevin Murray M.A. (pending), CAFS,
Movement Masterminds – CEO
Function First – Director of Education
2012 CSEP CPT of the Year

An Evolution in Coaching Clients with Pain

Written within each client are specific events and circumstances that have significantly shaped what their chronic pain experience means to them.

Elite-level coaches are not only well versed in the realm of biomechanics, they’re also able to recognize, anticipate and consistently meet and exceed the deepest psychological and social needs of their clients; which are often revealed BEFORE the client ever steps foot onto the assessment or exercise floor.

The landscape of helping those in pain is expanding RAPIDLY… Yes, biomechanics are an important aspect of a client’s story, but with much of a clients’ suffering from chronic pain revolving around psychological and environmental factors, the consultation / intake phase becomes that much more imperative when coaching this demographic.

In this 2-min video clip, come behind-the-scenes of our latest collaboration & partnership where we discuss how one’s cognition’s (thoughts, feelings, perceptions, beliefs, values, etc) significantly contribute to an individual’s movement success – or lack there of.

So for the first time, a curriculum that centers solely on the psychological, emotional and environmental factors involved with coaching clients in pain is now available in an online format – exclusively through the American Council on Exercise.

Exclusive Partnership with the American Council on Exercise

The millions who live with & suffer from chronic pain are in desperate need of relief. Together with the American Council on Exercise, the Yellow Brick Road seeks to provide health and exercise professionals an online course that integrates:

• psychological theory,
• pain neuroscience,
• interpersonal relationship-building principles and
• client centered coaching essentials;

So whether you’re a personal trainer, strength & conditioning coach, corrective exercise specialist, health coach, physiotherapist, chiropractor, massage therapist… the entire framework is designed to compliment and fit into your specific area of movement expertise.

Enroll here

Corrective Exercise Static Squat for Posture

Tuesday, October 9th, 2018

This is not your ordinary squat. This version of the squat has a greater focus on spinal stability than targeting the lower body. Although it does build isometric strength into the legs, it serves to facilitate activity and proprioception of the spinal erectors and paraspinals with the body vertical.

Don’t confuse this with the almighty weighted squat. The vertical shin position in this corrective squat has nothing to do with the wives tale of the knee not going over the toes. It has to do with the position of the pelvis and its relationship to spinal alignment.

Not only does this exercise facilitate a lot of muscular activity, but it can feel great on the lower back to many people as well.

Pain-Free Movement Specialist Sampler

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Here’s a little taste of just some of the great content in the PFMS curriculum.

You can register HERE

Corrective Exercise Abductor Presses

Friday, September 7th, 2018

An unexpectedly powerful corrective exercise that has an immediate influence on the hip joints, sacroiliac area and lumbar spine. The use of the non-elastic strap creates a distinctly different result then when using tubing and allowing the hips to abduct during the exercise.

You will most often find this exercise in our Sub Routine 1 as a Level A exercise in the PFMS curriculum.

Corrective Exercise Ankle Squeezes Prone

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

The Ankle Squeeze Prone is definitely one of our “go to” Level A exercises when it comes to addressing the posterior hip with the chronic pain client.

Proprioceptively, it can highlight left to right imbalances. Depending on the intention, this exercise is great for facilitating the posterior hip musculature or down regulating tone to those same muscles.

It’s also great for disassociating the lumbar musculature from the glutes/posterior hip by assisting in timing of the onset of contractions.

You will find this a great tool in your tool box for clients of all levels. The benefits to the chronic pain client is one of bio-psycho-social characteristics. But aren’t they all?

Leave your thoughts below on what you or your clients feel.

Corrective Exercise Kneeling Lat Stretch

Wednesday, May 30th, 2018

The kneeling lat stretch has many possible variations. In this video taken from the original Corrective Exercises for Powerful Change DVD, we show you several variations to try with your clients that effectively lengthen the lats and lateral line as well as address the thoracic spine.

Stability of the lumbar spine and shoulder girdle are critical here to protect those areas but also to maximize the stretch and tissue compliance.

Corrective Exercise Heel Drop

Tuesday, May 8th, 2018

Another great exercise from the archives is the Heel Drop. This exercise also comes from the DVD Corrective Exercises for Powerful Change and continues to be a highly utilized exercise in our progamming. Don’t let the calf stretching appearance fool you-there are multiple events happening with the positioning and requirements of this exercise. Pay attention to the details because a small change in position can lead to dilution of optimal benefits. Access to this exercise and many more are all part of the Pain-Free Movement Specialist curriculum

Corrective Exercise Abduction Adduction

Thursday, April 5th, 2018

Biomechanics never get old. This is one of the exercises from my very first Corrective Exercise for Powerful Change DVD’s. The content is still very relevant and part of our Pain-Free Movement Specialist curriculum.

The ability to take a step back to stimulate the hip motion without the hips being loaded in a comfortable and safe position can be very valuable for the client/patient with lower back pain.

No comments on my boyish looks then versus now please!

Bobby Cappuccio Coaching for Coaches

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

If you are like me and always striving to be better today than you were yesterday, you’ll want to take 6:00 and watch this clip.

I get to sit down with one of the greatest coaching minds in fitness who also happens to be one of the most engaging speakers you will ever see present at a conference…fitness or otherwise.

Bobby shares his insights on what keeps many fitness professionals from leaving what’s familiar and moving to what is possible.

We are incredibly grateful that Bobby has added more original content to our new PFMS curriculum. But this video is yours just for being part of the Function First family. But this video is yours for being part of the Function First family.

Follow and learn more from Bobby at www.robertcappuccio.com

The Department Store Approach to Pain

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

Written By
Kevin Murray, M.A. (pending)
Movement Masterminds – CEO
Function First – Director of Education
2012 CSEP CPT of the Year

THE SIZING APPEAL

The Small, Medium, Large concept to clothing that all department stores embody seems like a straightforward, pragmatic approach to sizing. If the article of clothing fits, you’re golden; If not, you’re either going up a size, or down. But what about those that fall between the cracks? Or above, or below those labels?

s-m-l

I constantly run into this predicament. Sometimes a small is too tight. Other times a medium drapes off my shoulders, which was a good look for me in the 90’s with skateboard in hand – not so cool anymore. I often wish there was a size “smedium”, right in between at that “sweet spot.”

Perhaps you can relate… maybe your frame deserves a “marge”, right in between medium and large.

ATTENTION ALL “SHOPPERS”:
DUALISTIC THINKING IS OUT-OF-DATE & NO LONGER IN STOCK!

Am I really posting up an article about clothing? As much as I dig fashion, the department store approach is actually a metaphor for the movement industry in many respects, and its modus operandi to complex pain problems.

For example, you may be familiar with conceptualized strategies such as:

• Tight hips = stretch em’
• Weak glutes = strengthen em’
• Noticeable swelling = ice that sh#t
• IT Band irritation = foam roll those puppies

A dualistic, department store approach emphasizes that although all individual’s move differently and come from different backgrounds and cultures, there are essentially only 3-types of people – small, medium and large. Chronic pain on the other hand is complex, embodying dynamic dimensions that encompass myriad variables expanding beyond the optics of biomechanical and connective tissue principles alone. A diverse approach to sizing is needed.

GEORGE ENGEL’s BPS APPROACH:
TAILORED FOR ALL SHAPES AND SIZES – SINCE 1977

Progressing beyond (but not excluding) biomechanics and connective tissue, a 3-dimensional approach to working with clients’ in pain include a vast variety of biopsychosocial ingredients and considerations:

• Systems theories
• Empathetic listening
• Uncovering client’s’ values and beliefs systems
• Establishing client trust
• Providing educational dividends around the context of pain
• Explaining the protective purpose that pain serves

are all in play when considering the Neuromatrix and its influence on how we collaborate with, and coach our clients’ in pain.

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SUIT YOU, SIR

Working with the chronic pain demographic is much like being a tailor. Each individual comes in with unique dimensions and constraints; different outcomes and desires. A tailor is seeking to understand where specific attention needs to be placed. A tailor asks questions like:

Why doesn’t their clothing fit?
Have they ever been to a tailor before? If so, what was their experience?
How will we know when a successful amendment has taken effect?
What is their specific outcome?

A tailor considers multiple dimensions into his/her analysis and thought process, outside the shackles of unidimensional constraints. Instead, diversification is personified, driven by the uniqueness of each individual and their articles of clothing.

Individuals’ in pain each have their own unique articles of clothing (yes, we’re still talking metaphorically here) that need specific attention and consideration. If you can meet your clients’ unique needs, much like a tailor does, than you’ll have accomplished something truly special in your clients’ eyes.

Amidst the waves of uncertainty that accompany working with individuals’ experiencing chronic pain and relinquishing a dualistic/department store thought-process, above all remember you’re interacting with another individual – and not a mechanistic instrument. Be kind, be empathetic, and as often as possible seek to understand rather than judge.

“The quality of the therapeutic relationship appears to be more predictive of success than any theoretical approach of the helper.” John Nuttall