Posts Tagged ‘pain-free movement specialist’

Corrective Exercise Full Body Functional Considerations

Monday, September 13th, 2021

Looking beyond the primary movement in a corrective exercise offers tremendous opportunities and insight into ways that we can influence our clients’ global movement needs. Here, I use an example of a familiar corrective exercise for the shoulder girdle and apply our Levels A-D strategy to demonstrate the different considerations when selecting a working posture/position.

It is common to focus on a joint or body segment only, when choosing corrective exercises for your client. Disregarding the implications (positive and negative) of the posture or position from where the exercise is initiated, means that we are not recognizing the integrated, functional biomechanics involved.

Corrective Exercise Frontal Plane Samurai Lunge

Thursday, February 11th, 2021

We have one of our Level D correctives from the PFMS library that is part of our educational website. Level D exercises are what I refer to as “top of the foodchain” in the corrective exercise world.

These highly integrated exercises carry extensive value beyond the biomechanical integrations. For some clientele, the Level D is the immediate segue to their more traditional fitness workout. For others, the Level D is an element of a workout itself.

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Functional Purpose:
Improve Frontal/Transverse Plane Spinal Alignment

Biomechanical Outcomes:

• Momentum from desired pelvic list promotes lateral spinal flexion, which is enhanced throughout the vertebral column when torso and righting reflexes resist maintaining a level orientation to the horizon.
• Arm overhead act as an extension of the rib cage, creating a longer lever and greater mass to ensure that all vertebrae contribute to the lateral spinal flexion.
• Maintaining a pure frontal plane motion with thoracic extension counters any rotational tendencies of the torso.
• Slight rotation of the intervertebral joints are coupled with lateral flexion of the spine.
• Lateral trunk musculature on the lengthening side are eccentrically loaded & decelerate mass of the trunk in the side bend, then transition concentrically to return trunk to the vertical.

Neurological | Physiological Outcomes:

• Promotes connective tissue elasticity associated with dynamically loading / stabilizing sagittal, frontal and transverse plane motions of the thorax.
• Increase connective tissue compliance and resiliency through the promotion of tissue extensibility, amplifying the viscoelastic and force closure demand to uphold lumbar spine integrity and stability.
• Extensibility of the lateral hip musculature to allow for and additional hip adduction, flexion and internal rotation.
• Elicit a heightened somatosensory response due to the simultaneous bottom-up (lateral lunge) and top-down (lateral flexion / thoracic rotation) influence.

Psycho | Social Outcomes:

• Establish a multidimensional environment involving the neural-networks associated with managing heightened emotional states (anxiety, hyperviligence, etc) during the execution of a complex, autonomic motor task.

Modifications:
• Begin pre-positioned w/ both hips abducted, greatly reducing ground reaction forces.
• Remove ipsi-lateral glenohumeral abduction.

Contraindications:
• Subacromial impingement syndrome.
• Inability to control multi-segmental deceleration of descending body weight.

Corrective Exercise Programming and Readiness

Monday, November 30th, 2020

What does readiness mean to you?

When designing the corrective exercise program for the chronic pain client, it means many things.

As you decide on your exercise selection, does a strategic sequence advance your objectives and build your client’s movement confidence?

The readiness in this case is based on many things, but at the top of the list is trust. Trust of their own capabilities without provoking pain.

This is precisely why we have created a framework for corrective exercise progressions.

Enjoy this clip and consider joining us on our mission to help those in pain live more comfortable and productive lives.

Corrective Exercise Static Wall Femur Rotations

Tuesday, October 27th, 2020

The following exercise is taken from our library available at www.functionfirsted.com

We share this example with you as an exercise that you might find useful as well as to add to your understanding of the bio-psycho-social considerations we apply during programming.

This Level B exercise can also be found in my book, The Pain-Free Program: A Proven Method to Relieve Back, Neck, Shoulder and Joint Pain.

Biomechanical Outcomes:
•Increase bi-lateral hip rotation autonomous from gravitational influence over the pelvis and entire upper body.
•Enhance transverse plane hip rotation independent from the pelvis and lumbar spine motion.

Neurological | Physiological Outcomes:
•Enhance cognitive processing mechanisms associated with the planning phase (evaluation) and motor unit recruitment involved during the execution of exercise.
•Promote connective tissue extensibility associated with internal and external hip rotation.

Psycho | Social Outcomes:
•The introduction of localized and independent hip rotation fosters a novel experiential awareness designed to help expand maladaptive appraisals and challenge any associated neurosignatures of hip rotation avoidance.

If you have not taken advantage of the 24 FREE PASS to Function First Academy to see all of the great stuff there, now is your chance!

30 – static wall with leg rotation.wav from Kevin Murray on Vimeo.

How PFMS Programming Excels

Thursday, August 13th, 2020

What drives your decision making when designing your client’s/patients exercise program? No doubt some of the decision is based on your client’s goals, as it should be. That is why they are seeing you.

But there are often many routes to a goal. And when we throw conquering pain into the equation, the route that is chosen becomes much more significant.

With the Function First Approach and its Pain-Free Movement Specialist curriculum, the sequencing of the exercises is critical. Much like a phone number, the same elements in a different order will often yield a different result.

With the client who has experienced or is experiencing chronic pain, the biomechanical, neurological and physiological characteristics of the exercise are critical. But those characteristics can be negated and potentially pain provoking if we have not acknowledged, validated and considered the psychological state (readiness, expectations, apprehensions, preconceived ideas, etc.) as it applies to the exercises we will provide.

And this is where the PFMS excels. Marrying the critical movement and mechanical needs to the psycho-social needs of the client at that time. Delivered with empathetic and confident coaching and you can see why Function First has served clients from around the globe who could not have their needs met elsewhere.

As such, I want to give you a peak into one of the many ways our Function First Academy can be a resource and support you in your mission to serve those challenged by chronic pain.
In the video below, I will walk you through a few of the aspects of the site that will change the way you program.

Corrective Exercise Floor Glides with Leg Extension

Thursday, November 14th, 2019

In this video we are bringing you a very influential exercise that does a surprisingly effective job at lower back stabilization as it challenges the mobility of the shoulders and efficiency of the the thoracic spine in extension.
As you are probably acutely aware, when working with corrective exercises and the client in pain, it is more than just the exercise, it is a thorough understanding of:

“For Whom?”

“For What?

And “When”

Insight into the biomechanics, psychological mindset of the client and social setting/implications of the movement all come into play and are critical to the client’s success.

Corrective Exercise A-P Cat and Dog Rewind

Friday, October 4th, 2019

In one of our past newsletters where we talked about myofascial mobility with rhythm, timing and amplitude, we revisited the Anterior Posterior Cat and Dog as one of the examples of applying those principles.

In this exercise, we take the A-P Cat and Dog and progress it into a surprisingly challenging core exercise. We call it the A-P Cat and Dog Rewind.

You’ll see as the clients center of mass moves forward with the change and limits of base of support, the core has to switch on in a very novel way.

The beauty of this is that the response is reflexive with no feedforward response necessary by the client or patient.

This helps us move beyond the bracing and “keep your core tight” cues that are not part of our long term goals and authentic movement.

Try it, feel it and let us know what you think.

Corrective Exercise Wall Glute Bridge

Thursday, August 8th, 2019

This version of the glute bridge is a great corrective exercise for teaching the body the sequencing and synchronization from the ankle to the lumbar spine that is associated with triple flexion and squatting.

It will certainly challenge dorsi flexion in a pseudo closed chain environment as the knee moves over the toes. There is feedback from the wall and load placed into the wall, but no vertical forces acting on the joint.

The body gets comfortable with relative lumbar flexion in an unload position because it has to go through that motion to get the buttocks of the floor. The beauty is both the novelty and very limited load placed on the spine. So even those with lower back pain will find this a helpful exercise as it reduces the threat.

Additionally, it helps create some separation and distraction of the tissue at the thoraco-lumbar junction. The upper part of the body is fixed on the floor as the lower part moves away, creating the distraction.

Put it to good use and tell us how you did!

Corrective Exercise-Half Frog

Thursday, July 11th, 2019

This simple exercise can be quite challenging for those with a history of lower back pain, as well as the deconditioned client. The ability to disassociate the hip motion from the movement of the lower back and pelvis can be very helpful in removing stress from the lower back.

This “Level B” exercise from the PFMS is both a corrective and assessment opportunity. You will be able to see, and the client will be able to feel any control and/or range of motion differences between the two sides.

The Half Frog is also an exercise, that as a Level B allows for more intrinsic focus of attention for motor learning purposes. The client is able to concentrate on what muscles are engaging and the sensory feedback of those contractions.

Corrective Exercise-Prone Single Arm Lifts

Friday, June 14th, 2019

This corrective exercise for the shoulder and thoracic spine is significantly more challenging then it appears. A great exercise to cue the thoracic spine and scapula to better “set” their anchor points for more controlled and stable motion of the shoulder.

Three different lift angles suggested to vary the position of the gleno-humeral joint and rotation of the scapula.